Port of Shanghai

Dec 03, 2021

Port of shanghai.jpg


The Port of Shanghai is the world’s busiest port in terms of cargo tonnage and the annual import and export trade through Shanghai, in terms of value, accounts for a quarter of China’s total foreign trade. The Shanghai port handled 43.50 million TEU containers and 510.19 million tonnes of cargo in 2020.

 

The Shanghai port has topped UNCTAD’s 2020 ranking of the world’s best-connected ports. In 2010, Shanghai port overtook the Port of Singapore to become the world's busiest container port and maintained its position as the world’s busiest port for the tenth consecutive year.


The Busiest Port in World.png



Port of Shanghai History

Port of Shanghai has a long and rich history dating back to the Qing dynasty in the 16th century. Its international significance began in the mid-nineteenth century, when it was forced to open for trade with the colonial powers of Britain, France, Japan, and Germany as a result of the "unequal treaties."

 

Following Japan's occupation of the city during WWII and its incorporation into the People's Republic in 1949, Shanghai and its port would take several decades to regain international prominence. This was partly due to the Chinese government's preference for Beijing as a business location and the state's fundamental economic weaknesses.

 

In 1991, the Port of Shanghai was given permission to implement economic reforms. This began today's era of economic and building booms.




Geographical Location of Port of Shanghai

Port of Shanghai is situated at the middle of the 18000 km-long Chinese coastline, where the Yangtze River, known as "the Golden Waterway", flows into the sea. It enjoys access to the southern and northern part of China’s coastal area, oceans across the world, as well as the Yangtze River basin, inland rivers of Jiangsu, Zhejiang and Anhui provinces, and the Taihu Lake, and is also near to the south of Qiantangjiang River. Served by well-connected road and railway networks, and fully-developed cargo collection and distribution systems, the Port of Shanghai occupies an important geographic location with superior natural conditions and a robust hinterland economy.




Shanghai Port Facilities and Terminals

Shanghai Port is made up of various facilities, such as the deepwater port, the Wusong Port Area, the inland port, and the port in the Waigaoqiao Free Trade Zone. An essential part of the port is the Yangshan Deep Water Port in Hangzhou Bay.


Shanghai Port Map 1.jpg.png

 

The Yangshan Port or Yangshan Deep Water Port, considered as the world’s biggest deep water port, is built on the islands of Greater and Lesser Yangshan and is connected to the mainland through the world’s largest sea bridge – Donghai Bridge. 


The port was mainly built to provide docking assistance to vessels with greater depth. Already in 1998, the Shanghai port authority came to the conclusion that the terminals along the Yangtze river were not sufficient to accommodate future growth. Furthermore, the maximum draft of 14.2m at the Waigaoqiao terminals started to become a constraint in dealing with the ever larger container vessels. In the end, Yang Shan, a group of small islands located at the mouth of the Hangzhou Bay, was chosen as the location for a new massive offshore terminal complex connected to the mainland via the newly constructed Donghai road bridge with a length of 31.5km. 

 

Since its construction,the Yangshan Deep Water Port has constantly recorded staggering container traffic statistics. In the fourth section (“Phase IV”) of the deep water port lies the world’s first completely automated terminal, which was opened recently, in December 2017. The automated terminal boasts seven berths along a quay stretching over two kilometers long as well as more than 130 driverless vehicles.It handled two million TEU in its first year of operation. Yangshan Port has been playing a vital part in building Shanghai into an international shipping center and Shanghai into an international shipping center. 


 


   

Throughput Growth in Shanghai Port

Shanghai was a latecomer to the container business, opening its first container terminal in 1983. By 1986, the combined volume of the top three European (and North American) ports had already surpassed 5 million TEU, while Shanghai had a much lower volume of around 200,000 TEU. 


Throughout the 1990s, however, the port of Shanghai experienced spectacular annual TEU growth of between 20% and 40%, while the top ports in North America and Europe saw more modest growth figures of up to 11%. Shanghai's throughput reached 5.6 million TEU in 2000, a 27-fold increase from 1986. The favorable policy of transforming Shanghai into an international shipping center, China's opening up, and China's accession to the WTO all contributed to growth remaining at a very high level between 2000 and 2007. Only the dotcom crash in 2001 resulted in a 'only' 13 percent increase. The steep rise in demand since the mid-1990s has resulted in the development of a series of new terminals in the Waigaoqiao area of the Pudong district, on the south bank of the Yangtze estuary and northeast of the city center. By 2006, Shanghai’s volume already reached 21.7 million TEU, thereby surpassing the combined volume of the top three North American ports.

Shanghai-container-throuput.jpg


Since 2012 the port’s annual growth in container throughput even remained below 5% with 2016 showing a very modest rise of 1.6%. Even at these more modest growth rates, Shanghai managed to add 11 million TEU to its container volume between pre-crisis year 2007 and 2016. Last year the Yangtze port recorded a total throughput of 37.1 million TEU thereby strengthening its position as the world’s busiest container port. 


Shanghai Port Throughput.png

*The port of Shanghai Throughput from 2016 to 2020



Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_of_Shanghai

https://en.portshanghai.com.cn/

https://www.ship-technology.com/projects/portofshnaghai/

https://www.porteconomics.eu/portgraphic-the-spectacular-rise-of-shanghai-as-a-container-port/


Port of shanghai.jpg


The Port of Shanghai is the world’s busiest port in terms of cargo tonnage and the annual import and export trade through Shanghai, in terms of value, accounts for a quarter of China’s total foreign trade. The Shanghai port handled 43.50 million TEU containers and 510.19 million tonnes of cargo in 2020.

 

The Shanghai port has topped UNCTAD’s 2020 ranking of the world’s best-connected ports. In 2010, Shanghai port overtook the Port of Singapore to become the world's busiest container port and maintained its position as the world’s busiest port for the tenth consecutive year.


The Busiest Port in World.png



Port of Shanghai History

Port of Shanghai has a long and rich history dating back to the Qing dynasty in the 16th century. Its international significance began in the mid-nineteenth century, when it was forced to open for trade with the colonial powers of Britain, France, Japan, and Germany as a result of the "unequal treaties."

 

Following Japan's occupation of the city during WWII and its incorporation into the People's Republic in 1949, Shanghai and its port would take several decades to regain international prominence. This was partly due to the Chinese government's preference for Beijing as a business location and the state's fundamental economic weaknesses.

 

In 1991, the Port of Shanghai was given permission to implement economic reforms. This began today's era of economic and building booms.




Geographical Location of Port of Shanghai

Port of Shanghai is situated at the middle of the 18000 km-long Chinese coastline, where the Yangtze River, known as "the Golden Waterway", flows into the sea. It enjoys access to the southern and northern part of China’s coastal area, oceans across the world, as well as the Yangtze River basin, inland rivers of Jiangsu, Zhejiang and Anhui provinces, and the Taihu Lake, and is also near to the south of Qiantangjiang River. Served by well-connected road and railway networks, and fully-developed cargo collection and distribution systems, the Port of Shanghai occupies an important geographic location with superior natural conditions and a robust hinterland economy.




Shanghai Port Facilities and Terminals

Shanghai Port is made up of various facilities, such as the deepwater port, the Wusong Port Area, the inland port, and the port in the Waigaoqiao Free Trade Zone. An essential part of the port is the Yangshan Deep Water Port in Hangzhou Bay.


Shanghai Port Map 1.jpg.png

 

The Yangshan Port or Yangshan Deep Water Port, considered as the world’s biggest deep water port, is built on the islands of Greater and Lesser Yangshan and is connected to the mainland through the world’s largest sea bridge – Donghai Bridge. 


The port was mainly built to provide docking assistance to vessels with greater depth. Already in 1998, the Shanghai port authority came to the conclusion that the terminals along the Yangtze river were not sufficient to accommodate future growth. Furthermore, the maximum draft of 14.2m at the Waigaoqiao terminals started to become a constraint in dealing with the ever larger container vessels. In the end, Yang Shan, a group of small islands located at the mouth of the Hangzhou Bay, was chosen as the location for a new massive offshore terminal complex connected to the mainland via the newly constructed Donghai road bridge with a length of 31.5km. 

 

Since its construction,the Yangshan Deep Water Port has constantly recorded staggering container traffic statistics. In the fourth section (“Phase IV”) of the deep water port lies the world’s first completely automated terminal, which was opened recently, in December 2017. The automated terminal boasts seven berths along a quay stretching over two kilometers long as well as more than 130 driverless vehicles.It handled two million TEU in its first year of operation. Yangshan Port has been playing a vital part in building Shanghai into an international shipping center and Shanghai into an international shipping center. 


 


   

Throughput Growth in Shanghai Port

Shanghai was a latecomer to the container business, opening its first container terminal in 1983. By 1986, the combined volume of the top three European (and North American) ports had already surpassed 5 million TEU, while Shanghai had a much lower volume of around 200,000 TEU. 


Throughout the 1990s, however, the port of Shanghai experienced spectacular annual TEU growth of between 20% and 40%, while the top ports in North America and Europe saw more modest growth figures of up to 11%. Shanghai's throughput reached 5.6 million TEU in 2000, a 27-fold increase from 1986. The favorable policy of transforming Shanghai into an international shipping center, China's opening up, and China's accession to the WTO all contributed to growth remaining at a very high level between 2000 and 2007. Only the dotcom crash in 2001 resulted in a 'only' 13 percent increase. The steep rise in demand since the mid-1990s has resulted in the development of a series of new terminals in the Waigaoqiao area of the Pudong district, on the south bank of the Yangtze estuary and northeast of the city center. By 2006, Shanghai’s volume already reached 21.7 million TEU, thereby surpassing the combined volume of the top three North American ports.

Shanghai-container-throuput.jpg


Since 2012 the port’s annual growth in container throughput even remained below 5% with 2016 showing a very modest rise of 1.6%. Even at these more modest growth rates, Shanghai managed to add 11 million TEU to its container volume between pre-crisis year 2007 and 2016. Last year the Yangtze port recorded a total throughput of 37.1 million TEU thereby strengthening its position as the world’s busiest container port. 


Shanghai Port Throughput.png

*The port of Shanghai Throughput from 2016 to 2020



Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_of_Shanghai

https://en.portshanghai.com.cn/

https://www.ship-technology.com/projects/portofshnaghai/

https://www.porteconomics.eu/portgraphic-the-spectacular-rise-of-shanghai-as-a-container-port/


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